Information Commissioner's Office launches consultation on new data sharing code of practice

Written by Liam Kirkaldy on 17 July 2019 in News

With the current code published in 2011, the new code, currently in a draft form, will aim to provide guidance

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The Information Commissioner's Office (ICO) has launched a new consultation on the data sharing code of practice.

With the current code published in 2011, the new code, currently in a draft form, will aim to provide guidance on good practice for public authorities, while also explaining and advising on changes to data protection legislation.

Launching the consultation, which will close on 9 September, the ICO said the code “will address many aspects of the new legislation including transparency, lawful bases for processing, the new accountability principle and the requirement to record processing activities”.

The draft code follows a call for views from the Information Commissioner in August 2018, seeking input from both individuals as well as organisations such as trade associations.

Steve Wood, ICO’s deputy commissioner for policy, said: “Data sharing brings many benefits to organisations and individuals, but it needs to be done in compliance with data protection law.

“Our draft data sharing code gives practical advice and guidance on how to share data safely and fairly, and we are encouraging organisations to send us their comments before we launch the final code in the Autumn.”

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