Parliament publishes new 5-year Gaelic plan

Written by Tom Freeman on 20 September 2018 in News

Scottish Parliament renews its own approach to the Gaelic language

Ken Macintosh - David Anderson/Holyrood

The Scottish Parliament has published a new 5 year Gaelic language plan.

The plan, announced by Presiding Officer Ken Macintosh, sets out how the Scottish Parliament will promote and support the language over the next five years.

Macintosh said: “For more than a decade, Scots law has recognised the cultural and historic significance of Gaelic, and the vital part it plays in our nation’s age-old story and identity.

“As someone born in the Highlands and the son of a native Gaelic speaker, I was proud to be one of those who voted to pass the Gaelic Language (Scotland) Act 2005.

“Over the past 10 years, our plans have ensured that people see and hear Gaelic being used in our Parliament. Despite the prominence of the language at Holyrood, Gaelic remains vulnerable and we cannot afford to be complacent.

“In this our third language plan, our focus is on public services and activities in Gaelic that provide a clear offer to the public, staff and MSPs alike. When it comes to Gaelic at the Parliament, we want people to see it, hear it, and use it.”

Daibhidh Boag, Director of Language Planning and Community Developments with Bòrd na Gàidhlig said: “Parliament’s support for Gaelic is crucial to the future of the language and we welcome the continuing commitment to ensuring that the language is prominent throughout the Parliament building and in the work of the Parliament."

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