Scotland's biggest solar farm planned for Moray

Written by Tom Freeman on 16 August 2017 in News

30-year solar energy development approved by Moray Council

Solar panels - PA

Plans have been unveiled for a new solar farm in Moray which will be the biggest in Scotland.

The proposal by Elgin Energy was approved by Moray Council yesterday, and will see around 80,000 panels installed across 115 acres near the village of Urquhart.

It will take up a 47 hectare site, with wiring underground to allow sheep to continue to graze in the fields.


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Work on the Speyslaw site is expected to start within the next few months.

Councillor Claire Feaver, chairwoman of Moray Council's Planning and Regulatory Services Committee, described the project as a "win-win"

"A significant amount of renewable energy will be generated by this solar farm over the next 30 years," she said.

"The opportunity to continue grazing on the land, together with the habitat management plan, will maintain and enhance the diverse range of species in and around the site."

Scottish Renewables policy manager Stephanie Clark said: "Large-scale solar has played a part in Scotland since 2005 and we are now beginning to see more applications for commercial projects coming forward.

"North east Scotland's clear skies and longer daylight hours mean the area is attractive to developers."

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