Getting to a Good Food Nation: Priorities for the Public Sector

The food we eat has a huge impact on our quality of life: from increased attainment and longer lives, to a strengthened food sector and money saved through home cooking. With public bodies in line for enhanced powers and obligations around improving Scotland’s food culture and environment, join Holyrood as we examine the powers you have to transform Scotland into a Good Food Nation.

Getting to a Good Food Nation

‘Our aspiration is that Scotland is a Good Food Nation, a country where people from every walk of life take pride and pleasure in, and benefit from, the food they buy, serve, and eat’. These are the words that define the Scottish Government’s ambition for Scotland as part of their 2014 review of national food and drink policy'.
Becoming a Good Food Nation

Now, the Good Food Nation Bill seeks to turn these priorities into legislation. The scope of these policies for public bodies would span health and health education, planning, procurement, food waste, food education and social care and herald new ‘good food duties’ they would need to fulfil. With obesity costing the Scottish economy up to £4.6 billion per year and 43,962 children accessing emergency food supplies in 2016 there are clear deficiencies in the current food ecosystem.

With the Bill due to go out for consultation shorty, it is timely to look at the powers local bodies have, the powers they need, and the powers they want to tackle obesity, food waste, and food insecurity.

Key issues we’ll examine with you

  • The Good Food Nation Bill in context – from reviews of food standards in schools and hospitals to the sugar tax
  • Influencing the food environment within our communities
  • Priorities for and importance of local authority procurement
  • Tackling obesity and bad nutrition through opportunity and education
  • Empowering communities through education, support, and the Communities Empowerment Act

Agenda*

9:15 Registration and Refreshments

9:55 Welcome and Introduction from the Chair

Tom Freeman, Health Journalist, Holyrood Magazine

10:00 Session 1: Policy and Ambition in Context

The Good Food Nation Bill has the potential to revolutionise how Scotland produces, views, and consumes food. In this session we will scrutinise the implications for local authorities – through new obligations and priorities – as well as placing these new powers in context.

  • The Good Food Nation Bill in context – from reviews of food standards in schools and hospitals to the sugar tax
  • The new ‘Good Food duty’ on public bodies – your obligations and powers
  • The challenge in creating a healthy and sustainable food culture – how ambitious can we be?
  • Ensuring good nutrition is a right rather than a luxury item

10:00 Pete Ritchie, Executive Director and Elli Kontorravdis, Policy and Campaign Manager, Nourish Scotland

10:20 Gary Maclean, Scotland's National Chef and Senior Lecturer, City of Glasgow College

10:40 Questions and Round Table Discussions

11:10 Refreshment Break

11:30 Session 2: Changing the Food Environment

From town planning to new standards for hospital food – the public sector actively shapes the public’s relationship with and understanding of food. In this session we will explore the powers and opportunities available to local authorities to shape the local food environment through means such as procurement, licensing, and community engagement.

  • Priorities and challenges around eating locally and sustainably
  • Influencing the food environment within our communities
  • Priorities for and importance of local authority procurement
  • Empowering communities through education, support, and the Communities Empowerment Act

11:30 The Public Sector as a Beacon of Good Food

This session will look at the role of the public sector in shaping the nations relationship with its food, the role of public sector procurement and how a Good Food Nation Bill can provide us with a legislative framework to ensure that every public-sector organisation in Scotland is a beacon of good food.

Aoife Behan, Head of Food, Soil Association Scotland

11:50 Becoming a Good Food City, perspectives from Stirling

  • “A Good Food City & Region” – what is this and why does it matter?
  • Background - the Stirling context
  • Embedding ‘Good Food’ in a Local Authority
  • Examples from the Stirling region

Ashley Robinson, Local Food and Drink Coordinator, Stirling Council and Forth Valley & Lomond LEADER

12:10 Why we took back the land and declared it our commons

Evie Murray, CEO, Leith Community Crops in Pots

12:40 Questions and Discussion

13:00 Lunch and Networking

13:30 Session 3: Changing the Food Culture

Obesity, food poverty, and food waste are all symptoms of a food culture turned sour. In this session we will look at the role of education, collaboration and legislation in improving food security and reducing waste for a healthier population.

  • The personal relationship we have with food
  • Tackling obesity and bad nutrition through opportunity and education
  • Food education within communities
  • The impact of food settings on how we perceive and relate with food

13:30 Iain Clunie, Food and Drink Programme Manager, Zero Waste Scotland

13:50 Food insecurity and dignity in emergency food provision

Caroline Mockford, Commissioner, Poverty Truth Commission

14:10 Our Food Culture; Sowing The Seeds For Disease?

  • The relationship between the food environment and food culture
  • The challenge of changing our values system
  • What can we learn from international examples
  • Where to start implementing change

Lorraine Tulloch, Programme Lead, Obesity Action Scotland

14:30 Questions and Discussion

14:55 Chair’s Closing Remarks

15:00 Close of Event

*Agenda subject to change

Venue

COSLA, 19 Haymarket Yards, Edinburgh EH12 5BH | Map

Costs

Delegate rates (excluding VAT):

  • Discounted rate: 1 place £145 + VAT (Voluntary / charitable organisations with an annual income of less than £1m)
  • Reduced rate: 1 place £245 + VAT | 2+ places £195 + VAT (Central government departments and agencies, local authorities, universities, colleges, NHS, police, housing associations, professional associations and voluntary / charitable organisations with an annual income over £1m)
  • Full rate: 1 place £295 + VAT | 2+ places £245 + VAT (Commercial organisations e.g. plc, Ltd, LLP)

For more information please email enquiries@holyrood.com or phone 0131 285 1635

Dates
7 June 2018
Location
Edinburgh
United Kingdom

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