Women paid an average 18 per cent less than men, according to IFS

Written by Liam Kirkaldy on 23 August 2016 in News

IFS finds that 12 years after having their first child women are paid an average 33 per cent less per hour than men.

Cash - credit: PA

Women are paid on average 18 per cent less than men, according to new research from the Institute for Fiscal Studies.

The IFS found that 12 years after having their first child women are paid an average 33 per cent less per hour than men.

Although the gender pay gap has narrowed in recent years, the IFS found that there had been little progress for highly educated women, where the gap has remained largely unchanged for 20 years.


RELATED CONTENT

TUC warns Brexit vote will increase financial pressures on households

Jeremy Corbyn to rule out election deal with SNP


The pay gap widens consistently for 12 years after a first child is born, by which point women receive 33 per cent less pay an hour than men.

Releasing the report, Robert Joyce, associate director at IFS, said: “The gap between the hourly pay of higher-educated men and women has not closed at all in the last 20 years. The reduction in the overall gender wage gap has been the result of more women becoming highly educated, and a decline in the wage gap among the lowest-educated”.

With Theresa May having stated her intention to tackle inequality in the UK during her time as Prime Minister, the research, which demonstrates the extent of the gender pay gap in Britain, highlights the size of the challenge she faces.

Taking over as Prime Minister, May said: “If you’re one of those families, if you’re just managing, I want to address you directly. I know you’re working around the clock, I know you’re doing your best, and I know that sometimes life can be a struggle. The government I lead will be driven not by the interests of the privileged few, but by yours.”

Share this page