Nicola Sturgeon ‘personally disappointed’ but congratulates Donald Trump

Written by Tom Freeman on 9 November 2016 in News

First Minister Nicola Sturgeon and other political leaders in Scotland release statements on Donald Trump's victory

Nicola Sturgeon - Holyrood

Nicola Sturgeon has congratulated Donald Trump on his victory in the US presidential election.

Scotland’s First Minister, who yesterday admitted she was backing his rival Hillary Clinton, said it was “not the victory I had hoped for”, but that the verdict of the American people should be respected.

Other political leaders in Scotland, who had also backed Clinton, expressed their disappointment.


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In a statement Sturgeon said: “I congratulate president-elect Trump on winning the election.

“We value our relationship with the United States and its people.  The ties that bind Scotland and the US - of family, culture and business - are deep and longstanding and they will always endure.

“It is normal in any election for those on the losing side to be feel disappointment, but today, many in America and across the world, will also feel a real sense of anxiety. I hope the president-elect will take the opportunity to reach out to those who felt marginalized by his campaign and make clear - in deeds as well as words - that he will be a president for everyone in modern, multicultural America.

“Today must also be a moment for those who share progressive values - all of us who believe in tolerance and diversity - to speak up loudly and clearly for the values we hold dear.

“I also want to pay tribute to Hillary Clinton. While I am personally disappointed that she will not be America's first woman president, her candidacy represented a major step forward for women in America and across the world - for that, as well as for her many years of public service, she is owed a deep debt of gratitude.”

Scottish greens co-convener suggested the Scottish Government should not allow Trump in the country.

"A year ago after relentless pressure from Greens the First Minister cancelled Trump's Global Scot ambassador status. Although Nicola Sturgeon has said the ties between Scotland and the US will endure, she must be clear that a racist, sexist bully is not welcome in Scotland even if he is US President,” he said.

"We cannot allow such a dangerous and deluded individual to have his behaviour normalised out of diplomacy. He needs to get the message from Scotland loud and clear that he will not be extended any courtesies as he has shown zero respect himself."

Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson said: "It's not the result I wanted but we now have to hope that President Trump turns out to be a different man to candidate Trump.

"Mr Trump tapped into the disaffection we are seeing across the world right now due to economic uncertainty. That's not something we can ignore.

"Those of us who believe open, western values are the best way to provide economic security for people now have to redouble our efforts to show they deliver for people."

Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale, who travelled to the US to campaign for Clinton, said it was a "dark day".

“While we must all respect the result of this democratic contest, today is a dark day for those of us who believe in compassion, tolerance and equality.”

She added: “I believe Hillary would have been a great president - the most qualified female presidential candidate ever has been defeated by the least-qualified male candidate ever.

“But the United States and Scotland share a rich history and friendship between our people. That will not be swept away by one election result.”

Trump owns property in Scotland including the famous Turnberry golf course.

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