Energy Saving Trust: 2015 saw biggest increase in renewable heat output since records began

Written by Liam Kirkaldy on 7 October 2016 in News

Scottish Government aims for 11 per cent of non-electrical heat demand to come from renewable sources by 2020

Energy minister Paul Wheelhouse - credit David Anderson

New figures show 2015 saw the biggest increase in renewable heat output since records began in 2008.

The Scottish Government aims for 11 per cent of non-electrical heat demand to come from renewable sources by 2020.

The figures, published by the Energy Saving Trust, on behalf of the Scottish Government, show renewable heat output increased by 1,100 GWh over the course of 2015, meaning Scotland generated between 5.3–5.6 per cent of its non-electrical heat demand from renewable sources – up from 3.8 per cent in 2014.


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Energy minister Paul Wheelhouse said: “while these figures show we are making great progress in both reducing our demand for heat and increasing the output of renewable heat we need to do more”.

In 2015 there was an estimated 1,504 GW of renewable heat capacity in operation in Scotland, up 47 per cent from 2014.

The majority of the increase came from large scale commercial sites supported by the Renewable Heat Incentive.

Wheelhouse, said: “Heat makes up more than 50 per cent of Scotland’s current energy consumption and approximately 47 per cent of our emissions - the largest source for both.

“That is why these record-breaking figures are so encouraging. They show that programmes such as the District Heating Loan Scheme, the Low Carbon Infrastructure Transition Programme and the Home Energy Scotland renewables loans scheme are inspiring people to harness renewable energy to heat their homes and their businesses.

“These and our other programmes support the uptake of the GB wide Renewable Heat Incentive scheme, in which Scotland continues to punch above its weight.

“That is not to say we should be in any way complacent. We have a target of 11 per cent of non-electrical heat demand from renewable sources by 2020 and while these figures show we are making great progress in both reducing our demand for heat and increasing the output of renewable heat we need to do more.

“So, these figures also highlight there is much more work to do to reduce demand, supply heat more efficiently and increase the role renewable heat plays in Scotland’s energy mix. That’s why we continue to develop new and existing avenues of support in this important area and this will be reflected in our forthcoming Energy Strategy.”

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