Learning Lessons From Scotland’s Recent Elections: An Accessible System For All

This event will reflect on the lessons of the last few elections and consider how we can continue to strengthen democratic process and representation in Scotland.

The context

When the polls for June 2017’s General Election closed the people of Scotland had faced 10 opportunities to vote in the last eight years. Many of the results have been surprising and some closely fought, with candidates winning by only a few votes. Scottish election officials have been under pressure to ensure each election was well-run and have largely succeeded. Notwithstanding the occasional local elections and by-elections, officials now have the opportunity to reflect on the lessons of the past few years as they continue preparations for the next national elections - the Scottish Parliament elections in 2021.

As we look towards 2021, we also have the opportunity to consider the additional powers over the conduct of Scottish Parliamentary elections and electoral registration transferred to the Scottish Parliament through the Scotland Act 2016 and the findings of the Law Commissions’ review of electoral law.

Key issues to be addressed

  • The lessons of the last few elections and considering the opportunities to strengthen Scotland’s electoral system
  • Electoral law
  • Prisoner voting rights in Scotland
  • Proxy voting, E-counting, postal voting
  • How can we encourage more people to exercise their right to vote including how we can inspire the next generation of voters

Confirmed speakers

  • Dr Jan Eichhorn, Lecturer in Social Policy, University of Edinburgh

Agenda*

Session 1: Taking Stock

In this opening session we will reflect upon the lessons of the last few elections and consider the opportunities to strengthen Scotland’s electoral system as we look to the future.

  • Scotland’s new electoral powers: next steps
  • Scotland’s national elections and referendum: how did we do?
  • Electoral law

Session 2: Accessible Elections

While confidence in Scotland’s elections is high, we know that the modern electoral process must continue to keep pace with the changing needs, and demands, of society. This session will look at just a few of the areas where improvements can make a significant difference to Scottish Democracy.

  • Prisoner voting rights in Scotland
  • Proxy voting
  • E-counting
  • Postal voting

Session 3: Engaging People In Democracy

In the final session we recognise that engaging people in Scotland’s elections is not just about process but also about information and education. In this final session we will explore how we can encourage more people to exercise their right to vote including how we can inspire the next generation of voters.

  • Helping the public to understand the voting system
  • Engaging our young people in elections
  • The role of political parties

*Agenda subject to change

Venue

Central Edinburgh, venue to be confirmed in due course. 

Costs

Delegate rates (excluding VAT):

  • Discounted rate: £145 (Voluntary / charitable organisations with an annual income of less than £1m)
  • Reduced rate: 1 place £245 | 2+ places £195 (Central government departments and agencies, local authorities, universities, colleges, NHS, police, professional associations and voluntary / charitable organisations with an annual income over £1m)
  • Full rate: 1 place £295 | 2+ places £245 (Commercial organisations e.g. plc, Ltd, LLP)

For more information please email enquiries@holyrood.com or phone 0131 285 1635

Dates
7 December 2017
Location
Central Edinburgh
United Kingdom

Tags

Categories

Share this page