Theresa May prepares for clampdown on high energy bills

Written by John Ashmore on 2 September 2016 in News

Georgia Berry, head of corporate responsibility at Centrica, appointed ahead of new proposals to reform the energy market

Theresa May - credit: Philip Toscano/PA Wire/Press Association Images

Theresa May has hired an energy expert from the owners of British Gas ahead of attempts to reduce high consumer energy bills.

Georgia Berry, who was head of corporate responsibility at Centrica, has been appointed ahead of new proposals to reform the energy market, according to reports in the Sun.

The paper claims energy will be at the heart of May’s first keynote address to the Conservative conference at the beginning of October.


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A government source tells the paper that Berry will be “a core member of the Policy Unit with responsibility for Energy and Infrastructure”.

Her mother Diana Berry was the Conservatives’ chief fundraiser from 2004 to 2008.

May has already raised eyebrows by delaying the huge intergovernmental project to develop a nuclear power plant at Hinkley Point in Somerset.

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