More than 11,000 air weapons handed in during Police Scotland amnesty

Written by Andrew Whitaker on 21 June 2016 in News

More than 11,000 air weapons handed to Police Scotland during three week weapons amnesty 

More than 11,000 air weapons were handed to Police Scotland during a three week amnesty held by the force.   

Crossbows, rifles and pistols dating back to the Second World War were also surrendered.   

Police Scotland confirmed that a total of 11,569 weapons had been handed over when the amnesty period ended on 12 June.


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An additional 1,000 have been handed in to officers across Scotland since the closing date.

Police Scotland will continue to accept them until 31 December, when new laws make it a criminal offence to have an air weapon without a licence or permit.

Under the new law, anyone found guilty of the new offence could be fined or face up to two years in prison.

Chief Constable Phil Gormley said the response to Police Scotland’s three week campaign had been "fantastic".

He added: "Every weapon handed in had the potential to cause serious harm within our communities if misused, and to have more than 11,000 fewer weapons in existence has made Scotland a safer place.

"I am pleased to say our officers are still able to accept unwanted air weapons, and would ask those responsible members of the public who no longer wish to keep a weapon, or to apply for a licence, to do so [hand them in], preferably in daylight hours, covered and in a way which does not alarm other people.

"All of these guns, and an assortment of other harmful weapons including crossbows, shotguns, rifles and several pistols dating back to World War Two, will now be taken away and destroyed to ensure they are off our streets forever."

 

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