Holyrood Magazine issue 385 / 19 June 2017

Written by on 26 June 2017 in Magazine

General Election 2017: Theresa May loses her majority despite the Scottish Conservatives gaining 12 seats, Jeremy Corbyn gains 30 Labour seats and Nicola Sturgeon loses 21 SNP seats to Scotland’s opposition parties. Plus profiles of Scotland’s 22 new MPs at Westminster.  

3 Editor’s note

Ordinarily, this bizarre, and frankly, unjust, set of political circumstances would be ripe for the SNP to brazen their way into another referendum, but that has been stymied on a number of fronts

 

6  Roundup

Pictures and numbers from the past two weeks

 

7 Talking Point

What could DIY and Harold Macmillan teach the PM?

 

9 Digital Highlights

The best of Twitter and Holyrood’s online content

 

10 Political Spotlight

Brexit talks begin without any clarity about what it all means

 

12  Cover Story:  General Election 2017

A dramatic descent from strong and stable to a coalition of chaos

 

18  Results:  Scotland’s MPs

Meet the new intake of MPs, along with a few familiar faces

 

24  Comment: MacAskill and McLeish

Thoughts on the election result from Henry McLeish and Kenny MacAskill

 

27  Feature: Connected Scotland

As digital now permeates all areas of work and life, it is predicted to transform the public sector over the next decade

 

32  Focus: Cyber security and GDPR

The spate of recent high-profile cyber attacks has pushed cyber security up the agenda

 

35  Profiles: Scotland’s digital defenders

An introduction to some of the key players in public sector IT

 

39 Event Report

Digital technology in schools is about supporting teachers, not replacing them

 

42 Comment

Dani Garavelli: Never mind indyref2, education is the pressing issue

 

43 Inbox

The general election, housing and unemployment

 

44 Diary

From Holyrood to Holyrood, the Lisbon Lions and the real world

 

45 On the Desk

Colin Smyth, Labour MSP for South Scotland, talks Queen of the South

 

46 Last Word

Sketch: Liam Kirkaldy on how Theresa May went about throwing away her parliamentary majority

Share this page